The Knowledge

What to pack – Nicki – Research & Development Intern

What’s your best travel experience?

Travelling gives you so many amazing memories it is hard to choose just one. But one of the most magnificent places I have ever visited has to be China. A world apart and relatively untraveled in comparison with a lot of Asia, I could go more than a week without seeing another person who spoke English, let alone another foreigner. The language barrier was really hard to overcome, but this made it all the more rewarding because by talking to the locals I discovered what beautiful and open people they were.

I spent three months zigzagging across the country, clocking up thousands of miles by every means including 24 hour train rides, buses with no speedometer whizzing round mountain bends at g-force speeds, playing the ‘how many people can you balance on a bike’ game and an all Chinese boat cruise down the river Yangtze. Although to some extent terrifying, the transport part provided some of the best opportunities for meeting people and getting a real glimpse of Chinese life.

Everything in China seems so ancient and spiritual. The architecture is so unique and colourful, the Great Wall goes on forever and the holy mountains are so huge and mystical that you half expect a dragon or two to come flying around the peaks. I didn’t believe it until I saw it but you really could have a picnic on the toenail of the Giant Buddha in Leshan.

Despite their turbulent history, people were always so friendly, and even with some of the huge differences in culture, I always felt incredibly welcome. You cannot go very far in China without seeing a toothy smile, smelling the roasting tea leaves, or being bombarded with ‘Gan bei’ (‘dry the cup’) from some enthusiastic locals before downing yet another Tsingtao.

What did you take?

With the language being so complex in comparison with our own and with intonation that can result in many a mix up, my phrasebook was my bible. ‘Ma’ is the word used when you are asking a question in Chinese, however, said in the wrong tone it can also mean mother, horse or hemp. After many embarrassing attempts I would often have to point to the word and hope that whoever I was talking to would get the general idea.

My silk sleep sack liner was also a godsend for those questionable sleeper trains. I once woke up to a man sitting grinning on my bed, having his morning shave!

What do you wish you had taken?

Although I packed pretty well, I do wish I had gone for a smaller backpack. There were many instances where there was no room for my bag in the luggage hold of a bus due to it being full of chickens or not having any doors. This meant a long and cosy ride on an already overcrowded bus with all my gear. Sardines come to mind.

The food in China was amazing. From centipedes on a stick to some blow-your-head-off spicy dishes. China is famous for its division in food regions with north being salty, south being sweet, east being sour and west being spicy. I wish now I had made an effort to note down all the amazing food and recipes I came across.

Oh and a lifetime supply of loo roll.

Which Frontier project would you like to visit?

In all honesty I would love to visit every one. But every time I hear about our Tanzania Wildlife Tracking and Community Adventure I go green with envy at some of the fabulous things they see and do.

What would you take there?

I have a really great pair of Hawke binoculars which would be top of my list to get a good look at some of the amazing African game out in the Savannah. From previous experience, I would take a huge jar of peanut butter to satisfy those cravings for something other than rice and beans!


What to pack – Tor – Overseas Operations Intern

What’s your best travel experience?

After 2 months on a combined marine/ forest expedition in South East Sulawesi, Indonesia, I spent 4 weeks independently travelling the central islands of the Indonesian archipelago: Bali, Lombok, Gilli Islands and Java. With a friend I hired a motorbike for 2 weeks to explore the magical island that is Bali, starting and ending in Kuta.

We soon became immersed in the flowing traffic, which I had until that point only experienced from the limitations of the carriage of a travelvan. Dodging between lanes, we would cross paths with different characters, my favourites including a smiling family of 5 squeezed onto one tiny bike and a trader submerged under a plethora of market-wares piled on every part of his bike.

On route eastwards toward Ahmed, we got “tourist-knapped” by a Balinese man called Salas; after being offered quick refreshments at his house 8km down the road we finished off staying 3 nights with him and his family in a self-constructed, 2-room concrete house overlooking the cliff top to the black sandy beach below. At some point during that time I believe we were introduced to every man in the small village whether it was for drinks, traditional Balinese round-singing, fishing, preparing and cooking the best fish kebabs I have tried to date, and generally sharing company.

It was 2 days in that we realised the extended visit was more engineered than it had originally appeared when Salas pulled out a collection of postcards from all over the English speaking world, written from other unsuspecting tourists passing along that same stretch of road 8km back, and who enjoyed a similar fate to our own. Salas had a comprehensive grasp of the English language which was self-taught from a book and practiced solely with people passing through his small, out the way village. He was a wonderful and generous host and it was the unexpectedness of the experience that made it so memorable. It was a big lesson for me, highlighting the benefits to be had from going off the speedy tourist track and getting to know the real life bubbling underneath.

What did you take?

For my 4 weeks travelling I still had everything from my 2 months expedition but most of it came in useful, and saw me better prepared than I imagine I would have been had I gone out entirely independently without a kit list. On our shared motorbike we had both out rucksacks slung over the foot rest, so crammed in amongst our luggage we felt like one of the locals.

My best items packed were my headtorch (with rechargeable AA batteries), originally for nocturnal frog-hunts in the forest, but also an invaluable tool for climbing Gurung Batur volcano by twilight; Lush travel shampoo bar which was a once weekly treat aside from my all purpose washing fluid for clothes, food, hands, hair, and without a doubt my collection of sarongs, bough on Hoga Island, which became an essential part of my travel clothing.

What do you wish you had taken?

Really high on my wish list while I was away was a reliable camera. I saw some amazing things that I wasn’t able to capture on camera. I have a collated album of photos from fellow travellers but it’s not quite the same as having captured unique moments for myself.

Which Frontier project would you like to visit?

Costa Rica Forest

What would you take there?

Binoculars so I can look high up into the canopy! My sarongs will definitely be packed, and they double up as lightweight fast-drying towels. If there’s not already one on camp then definitely a Frisbee for free time on the beach.


What to pack – Claire – Events & Marketing Intern

What’s your best travel experience?

Spending two months in Costa Rica learning Spanish and volunteering has been a hard act to follow! The last month in Zapotal, a small Eco-village three hours outside of San Jose was the highlight; no day was quite the same, so that at the end of a long day spent doing anything from making cheese, building a bridge or converting a pick up truck into a six seater using only two wooden chairs and some duck tape, you could relax with a cold beer and feel you actually accomplished something! Having a rainforest right on your door step, fresh homegrown food on your plate and a bustling community to get to know, this was a slice of life you definitely have to pull yourself away from.

What did you take?

Very little, I went for the ultra practical approach to packing; if it didn’t have multiple uses it wasn’t going in! This was perhaps a little too practical and I did end up buying things over there I probably could have bought from home; but with most things being very reasonable this wasn’t a problem. My most used items were my Thermarest and Canon digital camera, the first of which meant I could sleep anywhere including what can best be described as a wooden mattress in the volunteer house. Sleeping and capturing the best bits of your experience are probably the most important parts to every traveller.

What do you wish you had taken?

A mosquito net. Something every traveller brings apart from me; a bad move when you are sleeping in a tent on a beach and you seem to be the favourite dish of the day for the local critters! Suffice to say after a weekend in Puerto Viejo and two weeks in Zapotal I rather looked like I had caught the plague.

Which Frontier project would you like to visit?

I have always wanted to do South East Asia, mainly because it is an area of the world I know so little about. Cambodia stands out because it is not a classically hedonistic destination but has a character and culture all of its own; I think this is somewhere I wouldn’t easily get bored with. A teaching project would be a great way to get to know the people, make a positive impact and have some fun!

What would you take there?

A football because on a sunny day it’s the best way to get everyone running around!


What to pack – Heather – Overseas Operations Intern

What’s your best travel experience?

My best travel experience was during my Gap year after graduating from Uni, the three months spent in South East Asia being my favourite part. I went with my oldest friend and although we bickered like an old married couple, I couldn’t have asked for a better travelling companion! (it also helped that she is 100% more organised than me).

We ended up staying a month in Vietnam, not only because of the amazing food, but also lovely people and incredible changing scenery as you follow the coast down the length of the country. I was also surprised at how much I loved Malaysia, I wasn’t expecting it to be such a diverse and beautiful country!

What did you take?

I started off over-packing and ended up sending a large box of stuff home when I was in New Zealand (most embarrassingly hair straighteners! But lets not speak of that again) But the things I couldn’t live without were my lightweight sleeping bag, ipod (for those 26hr bus journeys) and definitely multiple packs of playing cards! They’re a great way to socialise with people, especially when there is no common language. Also useful to pass the time as you never know when/if your bus is going to turn up! Overall I think that just having a positive attitude is the best way to backpack, as now all my best stories are things that made me want to cry at the time!

What do you wish you had taken?

I only filled out my travel journal half heartedly and I wish I’d put in more effort as it is often the little day to day details that are easiest to forget but often the things you wish you could remember.

Which Frontier project would like to visit?

It changes pretty much weekly, but at the moment I love the look of Madagascar Marine. I’ve always been fascinated by Madagascar’s wide range of endemic species and I’d also love to learn to dive!

What would you take there?

I’d make sure to bring some form of underwater casing for my camera and also a travel towel as they are a saviour on the beach! I’d also think about something that the whole of camp could use with the locals, like a beach cricket set.


What to pack – Jo – Volunteer Coordinator

What’s your best travel experience?

Every country I have visited is so different and each has memories that make it extra special. I think my best experience would probably have to be the time I spent in Indonesia, with the FANTASTIC food, the unbelievably friendly people and the incredible scenery, it was so difficult to leave and I just can’t wait until I have the opportunity to go back.

I loved waking up to see monkeys climbing in the palm trees from the window of my little wooden hut, eating the BEST fresh fruit for breakfast each morning, heading out to explore forests and volcanoes during the day, relaxing on the beautiful beaches and coming home to enjoy a much deserved Bintang beer.

What did you take?

I am usually really good at packing lightly, but there are a few essentials that I take with me on every trip, no matter where I am going! I never head away without my tough underwater camera, which takes great underwater photos down to 10m and is perfect for a bit of spontaneous free-diving (as well as being able to handle being dropped, sat on and generally taken travelling!).

I also take tea bags and hot chocolate sachets with me, as you never know when you are going to miss a good old cup of tea and I find that hot chocolate goes down well after a full day of diving, even in the tropics. My final essential item is duct tape, which is MAGIC for fixing any items that break while travelling. I have used it to fix anything from dive fins to rucksack straps, and I don’t know where I would have been without it.

What do you wish you had taken?

I was always really jealous of travellers I met who had a good grasp of the language; no matter how hard I try I only ever seem to be able to pick up the very basics, and even then I seem to confuse the locals- so maybe a good phrase book! I also lost track of how many people I borrowed Lonely Planet guide books from, so in the future I will definitely be investing in one.

Which Frontier project would like to visit?

Madagascar Marine Conservation and Diving without a doubt.

What would you take there?

I would take a solar powered charger for my camera and my rash vest for when the water is just too hot to dive in a wetsuit. I would also buy a really comprehensive identification guide so I could swot up on all the species I see.


What to pack – Alex – Online Journalism Intern

What’s your best travel experience?

My best travel experience came in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon where I worked on a conservation project focusing on animal rehabilitation and documenting biodiversity in the area. With a tree house high in the rainforest canopy and eventful night-walks around the lodge, it’s tough to choose just one moment. However, night-time caiman hunting was always an exciting event.

After dinner all of the volunteers would gather in the boat, with the project manager perching at the front with a torch. As we passed the banks, countless orange eyes would glint in the torch light. Having made his choice, the project manager would hang from the front while the boat edged closer and closer to the beady little eyes. The silent anticipation before a well-aimed grab to avoid the caiman’s sharp teeth was always a tense moment. If successful, which he usually was, the scaly reptile would be passed between the volunteers while we were told a few interesting facts, like how their jaw muscles are almost completely dedicated to closing the mouth as quickly as possible to catch prey.

When I was faced with the opportunity to catch a caiman myself, the warning I’d been given about loosing fingers was obviously too much for me and I regretfully didn’t do it.

What did you take?

The project advised me on what I should be packing, and having never been anywhere like it before, I followed their suggestions carefully. Looking back, I could have managed with much less, like the expensive walking boots I invested in, which I eventually gave to a local farmer that we were working with. The most vital pieces of kit I took were a mosquito net, a head torch, a pack of cards with poker chips, and some good books.

What do you wish you had taken?

I wish I could have afforded a good quality camera to take with me. Going to somewhere like that is always going to provide great opportunities for amazing photos, like the iridescently-skinned rainbow boa that crossed in front of me on an early morning stroll. Photos will never be a substitute for actually being there, but quality shots are nice to have.

Which Frontier project would like to visit?

I haven’t dived yet, so getting my PADI certificate would be high on my list of things to do on a Frontier project. I don’t know too much about each one yet, but the photos from the Fiji project look incredible, so I’d have to say that one at the moment. Although the chance to work with all the African safari animals I’ve grown up watching on TV in Tanzania would be hard to ignore.

What would you take there?

Both Fiji and Tanzania would throw up some great photos, so I would definitely try to get hold of a decent camera. With all the diving in Fiji, I would make sure I could take underwater snaps too. Some binoculars would probably come in quite handy in Tanzania.


What to Pack – Petros – Gap Year Travel Advisor

What’s your best travel experience?

Living on an old steam boat made in 1876 in the Peruvian Amazon for a month. I was collecting fieldwork data for my dissertation in the Largo Preto Conservation Concession on a tributary on the Amazon River called the Yavari River (which forms the border between Peru & Brazil in the western Amazon basin).

It was an amazing trip with too many fantastic experiences to talk about them all at the moment but some of highlights include having to catch piranha for dinner, discovering new species of frog, pink river dolphins at dusk and catching a 7.5 foot caiman.

What did you take?

I tried to keep everything to the minimum so brought some basic gear really including; a head torch, insect repellent and a sleeping bag.

But the things I couldn’t have done without are my digital camera (which was only a small Sony Cybershot at the time) and a makeshift external hardrive fashioned out of an old iPod to store all the photos on. Finally and most surprisingly I had a couple of bandanas which I found invaluable not only did they make for a good bit of jungle chic but also came in useful for nearly all scenarios.

What do you wish you had taken?

Wellies, for some reason they just seem to be more versatile in a jungle environment than walking boots especially when it comes to protection from the mud (all the locals use them). Also a better camera, with a larger zoom which is why I’m now in the process of acquiring a Nikon D7000 with a 18-200mm lens.

What Frontier project would like to visit?

Madagascar – it’s been a childhood dream to go there which is why I’m looking forward to starting work there in September as an Assistant Research Officer . It has so much unique wildlife and as I’m a bit of a reptile fan I would particularly like to study chameleons. Also the new camp looks like it would be amazing.

What would you take there?

A solar charger for times when the generators not working, a dry bag to keep the camera dry (I heard I’ll be there in the rainy season) along with a light poncho and those trusty wellies.


What to pack – Zoe – Managing Director Research & Operations

What’s your best travel experience?
Cycling in Tibet – amongst the yaks in the Himalayas and slogging on up past the hikers on the ‘road’ to Everest Base Camp. Cold, bleak, riddled with altitude sickness and pure exhaustion. By far the most extreme and incredible thing I’ve ever done.

What did you take?
Spare tyres, sun cream, a goose-down jacket for the high mountain passes, sunglasses, water containers (1 litre bottles), Haribo tangfastics, half a ton of antibiotics, mossie repellent, one of those quick dry travel towels, head-torches (several – they break), penknife, string, superglue and gaffer tape (the last three are essential, wherever you go don’t go without them).

What do you wish you had taken?
My own saddle. I might have stood a chance of returning with all of my skin.

What Frontier project would like to visit?
Cambodia – the wildlife they see on a daily basis is phenomenal. So many rare and beautiful species. And they’re camping deep in the forest – it really is an amazing project.

What would you take there?
A light poncho (for the afternoon rains), a thermo-rest sleeping mat, a cotton sleeping bag liner to sleep in (too hot for sleeping bags sometimes), head-torches (several), heavy duty walking boots, string, superglue and gaffer tape.


What to pack – Charlotte – Overseas Operations

What’s your best travel experience?
Close to home but no less fun was one summer I spent working and camping through France. I was roped into renovating a derelict barn in the depths of rural Limoges for 4 weeks with tasks including pointing a wall, building a deck and laying a cement floor. Getting stuck in was great and the decking was christened with a party only the French could host with lashing of 99cent red wine and cheese – I can proudly report that the deck is still standing. Following this we were duly rewarded with a trip to the coast. Camping in the dunes, al fresco eating on the beach and surfing on the coast was idyllic.

What did you take?
Steel toe capped boots and old clothes for all that construction work!

More sensibly I always try to travel light and love the mutli – functional; a sarong can be a dress, skirt, towel, wrap or headscarf. For hand held versatility a Swiss Army Knife is useful in so many situations!

My Buffalo Teclite has seen me through many a cold downpour and is compact yet stylish.

What do you wish you had taken?
I fell on the wrong side of the ‘Great Sleeping Bag Debate’ and took quite a thick sleeping bag with me – ‘just in case’ as my mother would say! I found it was completely unnecessary and that it far too hot! I kept hearing people rave about their plush silky sleeping bag liners and I wished I’d had one of these.

What Frontier project would like to visit?
I often get asked this question and I find it so hard to choose – I would love to dive in Fiji, or spot sun bears in Cambodia, see whale sharks in Tanzania, hang out with lemurs in Madagascar and spot turtles in Costa Rica. Can’t I just go to all of them?

What would you take there?
As much as I love my Canon EOS 3000v SLR I find that travelling with hundreds of rolls of film is a bit of pain. I have had my eye on the Nikon D5000 for quite a while now and a round the world trip would definitely push me take the plunge and buy this beauty of a camera!


What to pack – Yasmin – Project Co-Ordinator Intern

What’s your best travel experience?

After my second year of university I travelled to Ecuador where I spent 3 weeks travelling before heading to the Amazon Rainforest for 2 weeks to carry out my second year research project.

I loved every single minute of the trip with highlights including Lake Quilotoa, surfing in Montanita, Humpback Whale watching in Puerto Lopez, a terrifying but spectacular bus ride through the mountains from Guayaquil to Cuenca and the nights out in Quito!
I was welcomed into the jungle by the Payamino tribe and trekked through amazing primary forest, discovered beautiful waterfalls and ate the most questionable food I think I will ever eat- I had no idea what to do with the chicken(?) claw floating in a bowl of hot water.

What did you take?

Obviously I tried to pack as lightly as possible but I managed to fit a surprising amount of stuff into my rucksack. This was mainly due to the fact I had packed all my clothes in two vacuum travel bags which were not only space-saving but also had the added bonus of making sure everything stayed dry.

For the jungle I brought a small lightweight hammock with a built-in mosquito net. Not only was it super comfy but it meant I was at safe distance from the ground and the bullet ants with which I had already had an unpleasant encounter with!

I also took spare camera batteries and memory cards so I could snap away without worry of running down the battery or taking up precious camera memory.

What do you wish you had taken?

I wish I had taken more time to learn some of the basics of Quechua, the language spoken by the tribe I stayed with in the jungle. I had my GCSE Spanish which was enough to get me around Ecuador but in the jungle this was of little use.

What frontier project would like to visit?

I would love to go any project in Madagascar as it’s a somewhere I’ve always wanted to visit due to its wealth of biodiversity.

What would you take there?

I’d definitely invest in a good underwater camera and a range of condiments and spices to add excitement to the staples of rice and beans 3 times a day!


What to pack – Paul – Partner Projects Manager

What’s your best travel experience?

Probably my most memorable experience was somewhat of a nightmare at the time. As with most travelling experiences, the challenging and difficult times are usually the funniest stories to tell your friends about when you get home, with this being a perfect example.

It all started in the rainy season of 2006 after hiring a moped for a few days and venturing off into relatively unknown rural Vietnam. Myself and a few guys I was travelling with were keen to break away from the usual travellers circuit, to get off the beaten track and so headed off through rice paddies and down winding mud roads into one of the amazing National Parks south-west of Hanoi. After riding the motorbikes for almost six hours, and with the light fading gradually, we were nearing our destination, the one (and only) guest house for miles around.

We were all hungry, but a few of the guys wanted to ride around some more, to watch the sun set and explore the local area before it got dark. On their return we attempted to order some food at the guest house, but were told by the suspicious receptionist that they couldn’t cater for us as their was no chef. Luckily, my friend informed us that we weren’t to worry as he’d seen a restaurant just a 10 minute ride away from the guest house that he had seen only moments before, and we should all head there.

So off we went, and pulled into the scrubland car park surrounding what I can only describe as a heaving, popular restaurant. We parked up our bikes next to the lines and lines of mopeds in the car park and proceeded to enter the rowdy mêlée of people. All the tables were jam packed and we had to go right to the back to find the only free table. We all looked at each other in amazement, “Wow this place must be incredible! It’s so popular!”. The waitress came over and obviously didn’t speak a word of English, so we just pointed to the table next to ours and said “Same same”.

The food came out and was incredible, but we hadn’t been given any rice, so again we motioned to the waitress in a demanding fashion that we needed rice with our meal. About five minutes later, a young girl approached our table and to our relief actually spoke a little English. She uttered the following words so politely and so happily it took a while to sink in “Hello and welcome into my family home. We are so welcome to have you as guests of honour at my brothers wedding on this wonderful day”.

Silence followed. Shock. And then slowly, as I looked around and realised that we were actually sitting in someone’s bedroom, completely uninvited, and had just demanded food we all suddenly felt incredibly guilty. We tried our best to make our excuses and leave and offered our hosts money in return but they wouldn’t have any of it. They wanted us to stay and they wanted to get us drunk. The evenings festivities continued with us being forcibly taken to the dance floor and being thrusted a microphone and expected to sing karaoke style over the top of some pretty hard Vietnamese techno, whilst at the same time being gyrated by young Vietnamese boys, who to our surprise have a tendency of dancing in pairs at really close quarters.

The complete and utter hilarity of the moment and the unbelievable welcoming that we were given, as complete strangers was one of those really special unique moments that make travelling so special, when international relations are strengthened and you reflect on how closed our own society can be. I will never forget that night. It also turned out that the incredible food we had been eating was actually dog, which for the record was exceptionally delicious.

What did you take?

I have travelled for the last 5 years with my trusty 35 litre Deuter rucksack. It’s pretty small, but that means that it is also pretty light. I regularly get comments from fellow volunteers and travellers commending my attempts at travelling light, but to be honest it does have the down side of being a challenge to pack.

A few things I never go travelling without include my trusty head torch, my silk sleeping bag liner for a lightweight, small sleeping bag which provides me with a little added comfort and reassurance after a long days bus ride when the bed sheets that I’m climbing into are a little dubious. Also a pen-knife can be incredibly useful for cutting fruit or making kindling to light fires or cutting washing lines etc. And never set off on a road trip without loo roll, particularly in China

What did you wish you had taken?

I’m always really jealous of people who travel around with hammocks and am continually on the lookout for a decent, lightweight one that I could just string up between two trees, or on a beach, or even on a steam boat sailing down a tropical river.

What Frontier project would you like to visit?

Personally I have a great love of rainforests and so any of our programmes which would give me the opportunity to rough it in the jungle such as our Costa Rica Big Cats, Indonesia Jungle Adventure or the Madagascar Expedition Management programmes. On the flip side I fell in love with Buenos Aires five years ago and would love the opportunity to return to join our Argentina Journalism project. I still dream about the ‘beef de lomo’ out there.

What would you take there?

If I was to head out into the jungle on a trek I would definitely take my new Thermarest Neo Air for some added comfort and a comfy nights sleep.


What to pack – Ben – Online Marketing Manager

What’s your best travel experience?
I spent a year travelling through Central America and living in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It was a fantastic experience and something I will never forget. I started the trip by working in Costa Rica for three months, combining some volunteering with working in a hostel in a town called Uvita. I completed my time in Central America travelling through Panama and Nicaragua, following the backpacker trail before a quick weekend in Guatemala and a flight to Buenos Aires.

In Argentina I worked in a Spanish school in the centre of the city, which was great for improving my Spanish and connecting with the local population. Buenos Aires really is a magnificent city and the 6 months I spent living there were filled with great nights out and some lifelong friends

What did you take?
I tried to keep it a minimum – I stuck with the advice of packing light and if I really needed something there was usually an easy way to find and buy something. As always on any extended trip abroad I relied heavily on a Lonely Planet guidebook. On this trip I bought two – Lonely Planet Costa Rica and Lonely Planet Central America and they were a great help both before the trip and during. I love their travel guides and I have found them immensely helpful. The key for me is, in my experience, their reviews of hostels, activities and travel schedules are very accurate. Although I have had one or two experiences where hostels have not lived up their glowing review, the vast majority have been great.

What do you wish you had taken?
I wish I had taken a better camera and a Brita water bottle.

What frontier project would like to visit?
I would love to go any project in the Cook Islands and the Indonesia Jungle Adventure looks like great fun.

What would you take there?
To the Cook Islands I would definitely invest in some good quality scuba gear and on the Indonesia Jungle Adventure I would bring a high quality DSLR camera to take some great photos.

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